Sound Design, Mixing, Songwriting, Remixes, Production, and Digital Mastering at an affordable price

"In my opinion, you need three things to make a great song: emotion, structure, and creativity.
Emotion is what drives us to make music. It's the feel, rhythm, and melody of the song.
Structure is much more 'left-brain' and is the process of arrangement, mixing, and mastering. It's something that makes songs more transferable.
Creativity is what makes a song unique. It's laced throughout the process; off the wall recording techniques, altered harmonies, switched up rhythms, sounds where they're not supposed to be that somehow fit better... Creativity is ALL about what works for 'this' as opposed to what we know worked for 'that.'"
-JKM

My credits include

Gear highlights

  • ProTools
  • Cubase
  • Ableton
  • Reason
  • Komplete
  • FabFilter
  • Flux
  • acoustically treated room
  • Yamaha and JBL speakers
  • Beyerdynamic headphones...

Genres I specialize in

Terms of Service

Contact me with what you would like (Mixing/Mastering/Production/Sound Design/Songwriting/Arrangement/Remixing/Instrumentals/Recording Advice) and I will get back to you ASAP ~ (1-5 days)

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Interview with JKM

Analog or digital and why?
As opposed to saying one way or the other, I'll just talk a bit about this whole subject. As far as recording goes, some good analog gear and a nice A/D converter is a must. For computer production, mixing and mastering though, its a different story. I've seen a lot of mixing and mastering engineers talk about how "the gear makes all the difference" on YouTube, and that's something I don't really agree with. Don't get me wrong, an expensive mastering compressor will make a difference, by all means, but 97% of a perfectly produced track has nothing to do with what hardware was used post recording. A good second, or third set of ears on a mix matters way more than running it through an $8000 mastering compressor, and costs way less haha. Mixing is almost entirely digital these days, I think because of the digital EQ. EQ's like FabFilter's Pro-Q2 have the ability to individually shape 24 bands, running in Mono/Stereo or Left/Right. Thats untouchable in the analog world... That being said, that mysterious last 3% of post production perfection seems to lay hidden in the circuits and tubes of analog gear...
Can you share one music production tip?
My biggest tip for people just starting out is "WATCH THAT CLIP METER! red means DONT!" I know how frustrating it is when you can't get your music to sound as loud as a professionally produced track but "riding the red" is a very precarious and dangerous habit.
What questions do you ask prospective clients?
I usually just try to get a feel for what they're interested in, where they'd like to take their project, and what they'd like me to help with.
If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?
A long microphone stand to fashion a spear, a huge sheet of sound tarp to keep warm and dry, a presonus firebox because they can start fires and most likely cook a fish, and at that point its pretty much a vacation [.
What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?
Noisia, Dr. Luke, Hanz Zimmer, Joe Ford, Timbaland, Dr. Dre, Deadmau5, Luca Pretolesi, Trolley Snatcha, Rza from the Wu-Tang Clan, there are just too many...
Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.
I'd say "general production" probably describes it best, mostly because no project has been the same. I've written and sculpted synth melodies for up and coming producer/DJ's, mixed songs in several genres, sold hip-hop instrumentals, mastered songs and DJ sets, helped set up home recording studios, replaced speaker cones for live shows, linked vocalist with producers, recorded bands in garages and $100,000 studios... But I still haven't done "it all" haha, there's always something new.