DG Sound Studios

Mixing and Mastering Services

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2 Reviews
DG Sound Studios on SoundBetter

Hi, I'm an experienced sound engineer focusing on heavy music production. I tend to produce (mix/master) tracks in the heavier side of the metal genre. I also do podcast mastering as well.

I offer mixing and mastering services catered to the heavier side of the rock/metal genre. I've been active in music for over 20 years, and have spent the last 5 years mixing and songwriting. I will be able to handle the technical side of the track as well as provide a third party input on any creative decisions the artist has yet to make.

In order to mix any song, I will need wav files of all the instruments and vocal performances, and most importantly an open mind. If you have any MIDI files of the drums or bass or tempo map that would be great as well. If anything needs to be edited, that will be an additional fee, otherwise the service doesn't include editing.

In order to master a song, I will need the stereo wav file of the song.

Feel free to ask me any questions you like.

Click the 'Contact' above to get in touch. Looking forward to hearing from you.

2 Reviews

Endorse DG Sound Studios
  1. Review by Fernando Andino
    starstarstarstarstar
    by

    Fantastic work by David. He is professional and delivers your product in a timely manner. He works hard to find the sound you're looking for. Highly recommend.

  2. Review by Giulio
    starstarstarstarstar
    by

    Excellent quality production, and professionalism!

Interview with DG Sound Studios

  1. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  2. A: I worked on a project for a local power violence band about 10 years back. I played guitar on it and produced it. I'm proud of it because the production of it was very chaotic and almost didn't make sense, however the energy in the studio translated into the recording and the vibe and aesthetic lined up perfectly.

  3. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  4. A: I'm working on a doom project now which I haven't done before. Its definitely a different aesthetic than tremolo picking and blast beats, which keeps things fresh.

  5. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  6. A: No one yet.

  7. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  8. A: Both. Digital has a lot of pluses nowadays over analog, and is so close to analog its almost impossible to tell the difference. Analog will always have that edge in uniqueness though.

  9. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  10. A: My first promise is that I will take the time to understand what they are looking to do. After that, everything else is technical in nature.

  11. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  12. A: I like the opportunity to be creative with people I wouldn't normally work with.

  13. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  14. A: Usually people ask about timelines and such. Regarding timelines, every project is different. A basic, straightforward mix should only take a day or so to get to a good starting point. Anything more complicated with higher track counts will take more time.

  15. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  16. A: The biggest misconception is that a good engineer can turn lousy performances into something amazing. If the performances or source tones are bad, the best that can be achieved is mediocrity.

  17. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  18. A: What are your expectations out of this? What are your goals for this project? Do you have any deadlines to work within?

  19. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  20. A: Spend some time on Skype or Zoom with them and see if your personalities click. You could hire the best mixer out there in the world, but if your personalities don't mesh, they will never see your vision and you will have a good sounding album that you ultimately don't like.

  21. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  22. A: My audio interface, my monitors, my computer, and my headphones.

  23. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  24. A: I've been involved in music for over 20 years with the last 5 of them spent primarily as a mixer. I started off playing in local bands, then got the recording bug after I had to record one of my band's album over 10 years ago. Since then I have worked on and off in the local music scene. I've spent the past 5 years though focusing primarily as a mixing engineer.

  25. Q: How would you describe your style?

  26. A: Aggressive and angry sounding. A little raw without sounding dated.

  27. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  28. A: I'd say any artist that doesn't fit neatly into any one box. Those are the mixes that interest me because so much of it comes down to getting the mindset right before anything technical is involved.

  29. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  30. A: Learn how to set up and tune your instruments properly for recording. There is a difference between setup for live use and setup for studio use.

  31. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  32. A: Heavier music. Black, Death and all of the variations of the metal genre.

  33. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  34. A: My strongest skill is getting to a solid starting point in my mixes in little time, and then being able to adjust from there to better align with what direction the artist wants to go in.

  35. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  36. A: A balanced and efficient approach to the mix. I am a multi instrumentalist so I have a deep understanding of what everything needs to be doing in the mix. I've also spent many hours fine tuning my mixing approach to generate a high quality product in a short amount of time.

  37. Q: What's your typical work process?

  38. A: I typically start off with the kick drum, then move through the rest of the kit. After that I get the rest of the instruments into their places. Once the band itself is sound pretty good, I'll bring in the vocals to sit on top of them as well as any effects. Before I finish a mix, I like to go through it to see if there is anything else that can be done to take it to the next level.

  39. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  40. A: I run everything through my Clarett 8Pre USB, that is the heart of my studio. I do have some physical amps, mostly ones that haven't been modeled extensively as well as some high quality amp sims I use to get my tones. Other than that, I like to keep things in the box as much as possible.

  41. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  42. A: Some of the newer productions from bands like Behemoth really inspire me. They have such a great blend of heaviness, ugliness, and clarity that I feel is the apex of the metal sound. I generally prefer bands that sound good without sounding pretty. Some metal bands nowadays sound like pop music to me, and I feel they are missing the vibe that makes metal special.

  43. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  44. A: I mostly do mixing work for heavier bands.

  45. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  46. A: I worked on a project for a local power violence band about 10 years back. I played guitar on it and produced it. I'm proud of it because the production of it was very chaotic and almost didn't make sense, however the energy in the studio translated into the recording and the vibe and aesthetic lined up perfectly.

  47. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  48. A: I'm working on a doom project now which I haven't done before. Its definitely a different aesthetic than tremolo picking and blast beats, which keeps things fresh.

  49. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  50. A: No one yet.

  51. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  52. A: Both. Digital has a lot of pluses nowadays over analog, and is so close to analog its almost impossible to tell the difference. Analog will always have that edge in uniqueness though.

  53. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  54. A: My first promise is that I will take the time to understand what they are looking to do. After that, everything else is technical in nature.

  55. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  56. A: I like the opportunity to be creative with people I wouldn't normally work with.

  57. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  58. A: Usually people ask about timelines and such. Regarding timelines, every project is different. A basic, straightforward mix should only take a day or so to get to a good starting point. Anything more complicated with higher track counts will take more time.

  59. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  60. A: The biggest misconception is that a good engineer can turn lousy performances into something amazing. If the performances or source tones are bad, the best that can be achieved is mediocrity.

  61. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  62. A: What are your expectations out of this? What are your goals for this project? Do you have any deadlines to work within?

  63. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  64. A: Spend some time on Skype or Zoom with them and see if your personalities click. You could hire the best mixer out there in the world, but if your personalities don't mesh, they will never see your vision and you will have a good sounding album that you ultimately don't like.

  65. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  66. A: My audio interface, my monitors, my computer, and my headphones.

  67. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  68. A: I've been involved in music for over 20 years with the last 5 of them spent primarily as a mixer. I started off playing in local bands, then got the recording bug after I had to record one of my band's album over 10 years ago. Since then I have worked on and off in the local music scene. I've spent the past 5 years though focusing primarily as a mixing engineer.

  69. Q: How would you describe your style?

  70. A: Aggressive and angry sounding. A little raw without sounding dated.

  71. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  72. A: I'd say any artist that doesn't fit neatly into any one box. Those are the mixes that interest me because so much of it comes down to getting the mindset right before anything technical is involved.

  73. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  74. A: Learn how to set up and tune your instruments properly for recording. There is a difference between setup for live use and setup for studio use.

  75. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  76. A: Heavier music. Black, Death and all of the variations of the metal genre.

  77. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  78. A: My strongest skill is getting to a solid starting point in my mixes in little time, and then being able to adjust from there to better align with what direction the artist wants to go in.

  79. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  80. A: A balanced and efficient approach to the mix. I am a multi instrumentalist so I have a deep understanding of what everything needs to be doing in the mix. I've also spent many hours fine tuning my mixing approach to generate a high quality product in a short amount of time.

  81. Q: What's your typical work process?

  82. A: I typically start off with the kick drum, then move through the rest of the kit. After that I get the rest of the instruments into their places. Once the band itself is sound pretty good, I'll bring in the vocals to sit on top of them as well as any effects. Before I finish a mix, I like to go through it to see if there is anything else that can be done to take it to the next level.

  83. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  84. A: I run everything through my Clarett 8Pre USB, that is the heart of my studio. I do have some physical amps, mostly ones that haven't been modeled extensively as well as some high quality amp sims I use to get my tones. Other than that, I like to keep things in the box as much as possible.

  85. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  86. A: Some of the newer productions from bands like Behemoth really inspire me. They have such a great blend of heaviness, ugliness, and clarity that I feel is the apex of the metal sound. I generally prefer bands that sound good without sounding pretty. Some metal bands nowadays sound like pop music to me, and I feel they are missing the vibe that makes metal special.

  87. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  88. A: I mostly do mixing work for heavier bands.

  89. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  90. A: I worked on a project for a local power violence band about 10 years back. I played guitar on it and produced it. I'm proud of it because the production of it was very chaotic and almost didn't make sense, however the energy in the studio translated into the recording and the vibe and aesthetic lined up perfectly.

  91. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  92. A: I'm working on a doom project now which I haven't done before. Its definitely a different aesthetic than tremolo picking and blast beats, which keeps things fresh.

  93. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  94. A: No one yet.

  95. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  96. A: Both. Digital has a lot of pluses nowadays over analog, and is so close to analog its almost impossible to tell the difference. Analog will always have that edge in uniqueness though.

  97. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  98. A: My first promise is that I will take the time to understand what they are looking to do. After that, everything else is technical in nature.

  99. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  100. A: I like the opportunity to be creative with people I wouldn't normally work with.

  101. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  102. A: Usually people ask about timelines and such. Regarding timelines, every project is different. A basic, straightforward mix should only take a day or so to get to a good starting point. Anything more complicated with higher track counts will take more time.

  103. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  104. A: The biggest misconception is that a good engineer can turn lousy performances into something amazing. If the performances or source tones are bad, the best that can be achieved is mediocrity.

  105. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  106. A: What are your expectations out of this? What are your goals for this project? Do you have any deadlines to work within?

  107. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  108. A: Spend some time on Skype or Zoom with them and see if your personalities click. You could hire the best mixer out there in the world, but if your personalities don't mesh, they will never see your vision and you will have a good sounding album that you ultimately don't like.

  109. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  110. A: My audio interface, my monitors, my computer, and my headphones.

  111. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  112. A: I've been involved in music for over 20 years with the last 5 of them spent primarily as a mixer. I started off playing in local bands, then got the recording bug after I had to record one of my band's album over 10 years ago. Since then I have worked on and off in the local music scene. I've spent the past 5 years though focusing primarily as a mixing engineer.

  113. Q: How would you describe your style?

  114. A: Aggressive and angry sounding. A little raw without sounding dated.

  115. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  116. A: I'd say any artist that doesn't fit neatly into any one box. Those are the mixes that interest me because so much of it comes down to getting the mindset right before anything technical is involved.

  117. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  118. A: Learn how to set up and tune your instruments properly for recording. There is a difference between setup for live use and setup for studio use.

  119. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  120. A: Heavier music. Black, Death and all of the variations of the metal genre.

  121. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  122. A: My strongest skill is getting to a solid starting point in my mixes in little time, and then being able to adjust from there to better align with what direction the artist wants to go in.

  123. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  124. A: A balanced and efficient approach to the mix. I am a multi instrumentalist so I have a deep understanding of what everything needs to be doing in the mix. I've also spent many hours fine tuning my mixing approach to generate a high quality product in a short amount of time.

  125. Q: What's your typical work process?

  126. A: I typically start off with the kick drum, then move through the rest of the kit. After that I get the rest of the instruments into their places. Once the band itself is sound pretty good, I'll bring in the vocals to sit on top of them as well as any effects. Before I finish a mix, I like to go through it to see if there is anything else that can be done to take it to the next level.

  127. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  128. A: I run everything through my Clarett 8Pre USB, that is the heart of my studio. I do have some physical amps, mostly ones that haven't been modeled extensively as well as some high quality amp sims I use to get my tones. Other than that, I like to keep things in the box as much as possible.

  129. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  130. A: Some of the newer productions from bands like Behemoth really inspire me. They have such a great blend of heaviness, ugliness, and clarity that I feel is the apex of the metal sound. I generally prefer bands that sound good without sounding pretty. Some metal bands nowadays sound like pop music to me, and I feel they are missing the vibe that makes metal special.

  131. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  132. A: I mostly do mixing work for heavier bands.

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A World Reduced to a Ghost by The Strangling Void

I was the Mixing and Mastering Engineer in this production

Terms Of Service

I provide one revision at no extra charge after final delivery. There is a $20 dollar upcharge for songs with more than 40 tracks. Feel free to contact me beforehand to discuss your project further.

GenresSounds Like
  • Behemoth
  • Gojira
  • Humanity's Last Breath
Gear Highlights
  • Focusrite Clarett 8 Pre USB
  • Two Notes Torpedo Reload
  • Line 6 Helix
  • Orange Dark Terror
  • Modded PRS MT15
More Photos
More Samples
SoundBetter Deal

I offer a free 30 second test mix to see if I am a good fit for your project

  • New Year 2021Jan 01, 2021

    Happy New Year Everyone.  No one knows what 2021 will bring us but the show must go on.  Feel free to message me to see what we can do together and hopefully make some good music in the new year.