Jed Cappelli

Producer | Beatmaker

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2 Reviews (1 Verified)
Jed Cappelli on SoundBetter

Producer, Beatmaker, and Mix Engineer with major label credits and over 15 years experience in the music industry. I'm a multi-instrumentalist, drum machine / vintage synth collector and modular synth fanatic. I believe that collaboration is the most exciting aspect of making music so hit me up and let's get to it!

My background is primarily in Hip-Hop and Pop/R&B music production, but through my extensive TV work I have professionally produced every beat based genre. I've been blessed to have worked with 'A-list' artists as well as up-and-coming talent and even a couple of legends in the Hip Hop game. I've licensed music (that I wrote, produced, mixed and mastered) for use on dozens of television shows on some of the biggest networks in the world. I've scored a video game as well as several short films / documentaries.

As a Producer I specialize in Hip Hop, Pop, Trap, EDM, House and Techno. I'm just as comfortable crafting a track from the ground up as I am adding a bassline, synth, or a topline (or anything else!) to an existing production. I have a collection of analog synthesizers and outboard gear in my hybrid studio which contributes to my signature sound.

As a Mixing and Mastering Engineer I try to work in as many genres as possible, but I'm most at home in the Hip Hop, Pop, Trap, RnB, EDM, House, and Techno genres (any Beat based genre really).

I'm new to this platform and excited to get to work, so hit me up with any inquiries you may have!

Click the 'Contact' above to get in touch. Looking forward to hearing from you.

2 Reviews

Endorse Jed Cappelli
  1. Review by Fabian W.
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    Jed did a fantastic job on co-producing our new beat! Love the way he combines analog gear with digital, it just makes the song feel more alive.
    We would definitely recommend him for any production work, great communication aswell.
    Thanks again Jed for your support, we can't wait to put this song out :)

  2. Review by Ava Santos
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    by

    Working with Jed was a blast! He's a consummate professional with great communication skills. He turned my demo into a radio ready release. Highly recommended!

Interview with Jed Cappelli

  1. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  2. A: My favorite part of creating music is seeing where the initial idea takes me. A famous writer once said that the best part of writing a novel is finding out what happens. I feel the same way about creating music. Something small might create that spark, like a simple three chord progression, or a bassline that get's you hyped that just leads you further along the path. Sometimes it feels like the track created itself. I love when that happens.

  3. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  4. A: I'm working on a Lofi project, designing sounds for a Serum preset pack, creating a grimey boombap sample pack, and constantly adding new beats to my reel. I'm also mixing and mastering a project for my dude Wips feat. Prospect and Fat Joe.

  5. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  6. A: There are a bunch, but I'd have to say that working in the studio with LL Cool J was the most surreal for me. Me and my production partner at the time, were going by the name ILLFONICS. We had placed two beats on what was believed to be LL's last album on Def Jam, titled 'Exit 13' (he resigned to Def Jam in 2019). He liked the rough mixes of our beats so much that he invited us to the mix sessions for the tracks we had created. I grew up as an LL Cool J fan so it was just an incredible experience to create music with someone who I looked up to as a kid.

  7. Q: Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?

  8. A: Yes, Darren Fewins is a great vocalist / vocal producer and an awesome audio engineer as well!

  9. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  10. A: Both of course! A hybrid approach to music creation gives a producer the most options. Obviously a digital audio workstation is superior to a 24-track analog tape machine for myriad reasons. At the same time, an analog synthesizer can be better (for crafting a certain sound) than a digital synth, it just depends on the sound you're trying to achieve.

  11. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  12. A: I promise my clients that I will do everything in my power to satisfy their needs, including revisions (within reason).

  13. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  14. A: Knowing exactly what a prospective client is looking for is important, so those are the kinds of questions I'll ask. Sometimes I might sound redundant but it's really important to make sure everyone involved in a collaboration is trying to make the same song.

  15. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  16. A: Make contact and ask questions. Communication is the most important part of music collaboration, and even more so with remote collaborations.

  17. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  18. A: Well, before any agreements are made, the most common questions I get are about the price of my services and what my studio is like... what kind of microphone and mic pre do I have, etc.

  19. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  20. A: A potential misconception could be that certain producers with a lot of experience are too expensive to hire. I've always tried to work within an artist's budget and I encourage potential clients who feel like they want to reach out to do so... everything is negotiable.

  21. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  22. A: I studied music technology at New York University but I dropped out and started working in the industry. My first beat placement was on the Re-Up gang album (featuring Clipse) in around 2007. Me and my partner at that time were also licensing a bunch of our beats on the MTV show Rob & Big and that led to years of that kinda work... music for TV. At the same time we were getting major label placements for the likes of Jim Jones and LL Cool J, etc. All the while I was also doing tracking and mixing work. I actually took some time off for a few years and went back to school because I was paying back student loans for a degree I had not gotten yet and that just didn't make sense to me. So I eventually graduated from NYU with a degree in Music Technology and went back into full time production and engineering. It's been a roundabout journey!

  23. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  24. A: My best piece of advice for up-and-coming music producers would be to learn how to program synthesizers so you can design your own sounds. So many people have access to Splice and the same synth plug-ins nowadays, and so many people are using those same presets, so if you want a signature sound (who doesnt?) the best way to do it is to design your sounds from the ground up. Also, what I've always tried to do is to find out what synth plug-in everyone is using in a particular genre and then NEVER USE THAT SYNTH in that genre. If everyone is using the same synth for making... let's say trap beats, then if you wanna stand out, use something different.

  25. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  26. A: I've done a ton of Hip Hop, pop, and electronic music production. I've also done several House remixes for Strictly Rhythm records which is a famous New York House label. I've produced electro and techno as well.

  27. Q: What's your typical work process?

  28. A: When it comes to production I rarely use sample packs or even synth presets, and I never use midi packs. Although, if a client wants a modern sound I will log into my Splice account. I prefer to write all original music and to design my own synth sounds. When it comes to mixing and mastering, the most important part of the process is communicating with the client and being open to do revisions.

  29. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  30. A: Macbook Pro, Apollo Twin, ADAM monitors (I'll count that as one), a Telefunken 251, and my eurorack synth system.

  31. Q: How would you describe your style?

  32. A: I tend to lean toward darker more melancholic music in general, but I also love uplifting chord progressions and glossy productions. It really depends on the project, obviously, but when I'm creating music for myself it's almost always a bit on the experimental, psychedelic, and dark side.

  33. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  34. A: I'd definitely like to work with Travis Scott. He's a rapper with non-rap influences and you can hear that in the references he makes in his lyrics, and his overall style. I've always liked that kinda thing, infusing influences from one genre of music into another. His music is also predominantly dark and when I produce music for myself I tend to lean in that direction as well.

  35. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  36. A: I'm running a Mac OS based system (Pro-Tools, Logic, and Ableton) with a UAD Apollo interface and ADAM A7 monitors. I've been in the industry for a while so I've collected a decent amount of hardware synthesizers including a Roland Juno-106, Roland JX-3P (both originals), a Korg MS-20, and a medium sized euro-rack modular synth setup. Over the last 5 years I've transitioned to a primarily in-the-box mixing rig including UAD, Waves, Fab Filter, and Sound Toys plug-ins. I do still own some vintage hardware audio processors like a rack mount SansAmp and an Ensoniq DP4+ among others.

  37. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  38. A: My strongest skill is in music production and beat making.

  39. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  40. A: Well, I've been producing and mixing records for over 15 years so I bring a lot of experience. I've co-produced and co-written songs with some industry legends including LL Cool J who was just inducted into the Rock and Roll hall of fame. I've worked in some of the biggest studios in New York, including Platinum Sound, Sony Music Studios (now defunct), and Engine Room Audio. That kind of real world, industry experience is what I bring to the table.

  41. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  42. A: Rick Rubin, Mike Dean, Dr. Dre, Alchemist, and Deadmau5 to name a few.

  43. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  44. A: Most of my credits are in music production and beat making. However, I've licensed dozens of original instrumentals (which I produced, mixed, and mastered) to various major network television shows so I also have a ton of experience in mixing and mastering.

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Queen's Gambit

I was the Producer | Programmer | Mixer in this production

Terms Of Service

Everything is negotiable depending on your budget. I want you to be 100% satisfied, regardless of how many revisions it takes. The typical turn around time depends on the job.

GenresSounds Like
  • Travis Scott
  • Griselda
  • Jim Jones
Gear Highlights
  • Mac
  • UAD Apollo interface
  • ADAM A7x monitors
  • Roland Juno-106
  • Korg MS-20
  • Roland JX-3P
  • Eurorack Modular Synth
More Photos
More Samples
SoundBetter Deal

I'm new to this platform so I'm offering a 25% discount from my standard rates for the first 10 people who contact me.

  • Currently working on a Lo-fi projectJul 23, 2021

    Coming soon!