Christopher Hodges

Bass, Mixing, Editing

Christopher Hodges on SoundBetter

Versatile electric and double bassist with mad Pro Tools chops to boot. Also proficient in Ableton, Logic, and Cubase.

For over 25 years, I've been working in almost every aspect of live and recorded music. In the studio, I work to setup sessions, mix and master, record (on multiple instruments), and everything in between. Live is no different. I perform, Music Direct, Build and run playback systems, work as FOH and monitor engineer, setup audio systems, etc. It's time to bring that level of expertise into your project.

Bass:
High level electric and upright bass tracks recorded with pro gear and delivered in lossless format. Each pass can be recorded through multiple amps/mics and presented together to allow your mix engineer to blend as they see fit.

Composing:
Music for picture, underscore, or podcast (intro and outro)

Podcast Editing/Mixing/Mastering:
Timely turn over with smooth edits, noise reduction, and source enhancement. Delivered in accordance with compression and LUFS specifications.

Mixing:
A stereo mix of your song ready for mastering.

Editing:
Got some great takes but missed note here and there? Drums off a little and need to be nudged? I can help get your track ready for mixing by polishing up the timing, tuning vocals, or cutting and splicing parts to make them fit together just right.

Send me an email through 'Contact' button above and I'll get back to you asap.

Interview with Christopher Hodges

  1. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  2. A: There's beauty in both. Some music sounds better with the warmth and harmonic distortion but some is better off with the crispness of digital reproduction. Plus, what I like analog, others think would sound better digital. It's in the ear of the beholder.

  3. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  4. A: To serve your project and honor your vision and efforts.

  5. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  6. A: Are you kidding? I make music for a living. AND, I get to collaborate with amazing people.

  7. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  8. A: That you want or need to be famous to make a living doing music.

  9. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  10. A: Your project is special to you. Even if you haven't had it in your hands for very long, it will someday bear your stamp. Make sure whoever works on it has your vision in mind and honors that as they add to it.

  11. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  12. A: I started performing on bass and vocals in my early teens. A couple years later, I got hooked on jazz and the big band arrangements that Jaco Pastorious had kicked out. I fell down the jazz rabbit hole fast and hard so I practiced and studied music theory constantly until I ended up in college studying music and performing in the school jazz ensembles. I maintained my own ensembles as well, performing original material at concerts and festivals a long with standards and covers for private events. Even releasing a couple of albums along the way. I also stayed active in rock, pop, hip hop, country, and other genres through work as a freelance and session bassist. By the time I left university, I had become more and more interested in live events and modern concert production. So, I took my knowledge of performing and studio recording and jumped into the live side of life - becoming proficient in audio and playback, lighting design, scenic design, rigging, producing, etc. Almost a decade into that and I started to notice I really missed the studio. So, I began to pivot my workload to allow me more time to work on session work, composing, producing, and mixing. Soon after the pivot, I started my own label and production company focusing on helping artists and composers get what they need to make their projects see daylight.

  13. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  14. A: I hope I bring what the song needs; not what I want to show off about my tone or chops.

  15. Q: What's your typical work process?

  16. A: I need to wrap my head around a project before I start on it so I begin with a 30,000 ft view and dig down to the details as I get ready to work. For instance, If I'm tracking an instrument, I listen to the song all the way through then again as I mark the different sections and note any runs or hits that I want/need to follow or duplicate. Then, it's all about figuring out the harmonic progressions and how I want to handle them.

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These Hills by The Carolina Stomp

I was the Mix Engineer, Bassist in this production

Terms Of Service

For bass, mixing, and editing projects: 1-5 day turn-around time with up to two free revisions (after which a small fee per revision will be added). For compositions: 2-7 days and two free revisions.

Gear Highlights
  • Warrior Adam Nitti Signature bass
  • Kay (1960) Upright Bass
  • David Eden WT550 bass head
  • Pro Tools
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SoundBetter Deal

Multiple-track projects get a discounted per song rate.