Hi there! I'm Andy and I'd love to talk about your record. I love getting involved with a band - I almost join every band I work with. Let's chat about your project and see if we get along. If we do, I'll make a record that is the best version of what you can do creatively. It's your vision. Let's see if I can help guide it home.

Andy Freeman got his hands on a console at age 12 and has been producing and mixing bands since 2001. Learning on the job at his own studio in Atlanta, he moved to San Francisco in 2008, then to Los Angeles in 2015. He has worked with Eisley, Manchester Orchestra, Jet Trash, Branches, Bonnie Bishop, and many others.

My credits include

AllMusic verified credits for Andy Freeman:

  • Eisley
  • Ameet Kamath
  • Chris Duarte
  • Chris Duarte
  • The Chris Duarte Group
  • Catholic Radio
  • Catholic Radio
  • The Real Numbers

Genres I specialize in

Terms of Service

50% down, 50% upon completion. Mix recalls within reason.

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Interview with Andy Freeman

Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?
I'm pretty proud of the Jet Trash stuff that came out on Wiener Records July 2015. We spent a month in the rehearsal space (2x a week) working out the songs and performances, then we got in Coast Recorders in San Francisco and knocked it out in four days. I engineered and mixed, and now it's in rotation at KCRW, they have a publishing deal, they've gotten a placement on USA Network, it's being picked up in press all over the place....this one has legs and I'm happy to say I worked on it.
What are you working on at the moment?
Mixing a record for a band out of Columbia, MO. We did basics in San Francisco (I engineered and co-produced those, drum teched, provided backline, etc.) and they added synths and things in Missouri. Now I'm circling back to mix the project. Next up is mixing the first full-length for San Francisco's Before the Brave. I produced and engineered everything on it. That band is ready to be bigger. Can't wait!
Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?
Don't know a lot of these people but it looks like Andrew Scheps is part of this and he's a great guy.
Analog or digital and why?
For engineering, I want the best possible analog front end I can get. For mixing, digital because of recalls.
What's your 'promise' to your clients?
I'll get it where you want it to be. I haven't had a dissatisfied client in many years.
What do you like most about your job?
I get to work with bands and artists. I've been my own boss for a decade and a half. I get to see creativity in action! Tell me that isn't a dream job!
What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?
Beyond rates? They want to know if I vibe with a project. If I "get" them. If I do, I'll tell them. If not, I'm fine letting somebody else work on it.
What's the biggest misconception about what you do?
Well, like anyone in audio, the misconception is that we can read minds, particularly when it comes to mix time. But I've gotten good at preparing people for those conversations. Knowing what to ask for beforehand - sometimes way beforehand - can avoid those weird, "I thought you knew!" exchanges.
What questions do you ask prospective clients?
Which band - from any era - would it make sense to tour with? I find this gets a clearer response than "who do you sound like?".
What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?
Ask questions and come prepared with references.
If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?
Neve 1073, U67, SM57, KM84's, 1176. (Assuming I had something to plug them into and band to work with!)
What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?
Self-taught, and I've been doing this 15 years full time. Had a studio in Atlanta and learned on the job. Moved to San Francisco in 2008 and did a lot of the biggest things in that town (I still do a lot of work up there). I had a room at Coast Recorders - a Bill Putnam room - and now I work out of Tiny Telephone when I'm up there. I moved to LA in February 2015 and have been getting traction down here almost instantly.
How would you describe your style?
I don't have a style. That's my style. Nobody wants to hear an Andy Freeman record, they want to hear a record by their favorite artists. It's up to me to see what the artist wants and take it there.
Which artist would you like to work with and why?
Kings of Leon. I don't know their process (other than the documentary and their albums) but I think I could make a great record with them.
Can you share one music production tip?
If i'm in a room with a band working on songs, I want them thinking about making musical sense. I want them asking "why am I playing this right now?". To connect with a listener, every aspect of a song has to have thought behind it. The listener will care only as much as the artist does.
What type of music do you usually work on?
Indie and rock.
What's your strongest skill?
Beyond just technical skills (which should be the barrier of entry for something like this) handling people and managing expectations are strong suits of mine. I get along with artists very, very well.
What do you bring to a song?
I'm really good at making a song sound like what it should be. I don't have a "sound" of my own. If a band gives me references and the lines of communication are open, I can take it most anywhere.
What's your typical work process?
For mixing, I'll talk with the band (phone/skype/facetime/email) and figure out where they want the project to go. I'll get references and study those. When I get the tracks I listen faders-up and start digging in. I'm comfortable doing recalls and know how to guide a band through the process. For production, I get a notebook and the band's discography and start taking notes. Then it's time to listen to demos of the new stuff, hit the rehearsal space for lots of pre-production. By the time we go to a nice studio, the songs are ready and we can focus on tones and performances.
Tell us about your studio setup.
For mixing: Hybrid or in-the-box depending on what the music calls for. I have an 18-chip UAD2 system (Thunderbolt), mix with Pro Tools HD 12.1 and have a lot of analog stuff for the hybrid thing - Neve, API, Electrodyne, Empirical Labs, etc. I mix on Tannoy System 10's and Pelonis System 42's. For tracking and production work, I have TONS of drums (five kits, 15 snares), a dozen or so guitars and basses, lots and lots of tube amps of various vintages, and a healthy collection of my essential mics, like Coles, Bock, Soundelux, vintage Neumann, etc. I work out of the best-sounding room I can find, given budget.
What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?
Michael Beinhorn, Andrew Scheps, Vance Powell. I'm pleased to call them all friends.
Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.
Production/Engineering/Mixing. For production, I mean old-school. Getting in a room with a band and working out songs together. For mixing, I'm comfortable with remote mixing over the internet. I also stream mixes as I'm working on them so the client can feel involved.
Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?
I'm pretty proud of the Jet Trash stuff that came out on Wiener Records July 2015. We spent a month in the rehearsal space (2x a week) working out the songs and performances, then we got in Coast Recorders in San Francisco and knocked it out in four days. I engineered and mixed, and now it's in rotation at KCRW, they have a publishing deal, they've gotten a placement on USA Network, it's being picked up in press all over the place....this one has legs and I'm happy to say I worked on it.
What are you working on at the moment?
Mixing a record for a band out of Columbia, MO. We did basics in San Francisco (I engineered and co-produced those, drum teched, provided backline, etc.) and they added synths and things in Missouri. Now I'm circling back to mix the project. Next up is mixing the first full-length for San Francisco's Before the Brave. I produced and engineered everything on it. That band is ready to be bigger. Can't wait!
Is there anyone on SoundBetter you know and would recommend to your clients?
Don't know a lot of these people but it looks like Andrew Scheps is part of this and he's a great guy.
Analog or digital and why?
For engineering, I want the best possible analog front end I can get. For mixing, digital because of recalls.
What's your 'promise' to your clients?
I'll get it where you want it to be. I haven't had a dissatisfied client in many years.
What do you like most about your job?
I get to work with bands and artists. I've been my own boss for a decade and a half. I get to see creativity in action! Tell me that isn't a dream job!
What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?
Beyond rates? They want to know if I vibe with a project. If I "get" them. If I do, I'll tell them. If not, I'm fine letting somebody else work on it.
What's the biggest misconception about what you do?
Well, like anyone in audio, the misconception is that we can read minds, particularly when it comes to mix time. But I've gotten good at preparing people for those conversations. Knowing what to ask for beforehand - sometimes way beforehand - can avoid those weird, "I thought you knew!" exchanges.
What questions do you ask prospective clients?
Which band - from any era - would it make sense to tour with? I find this gets a clearer response than "who do you sound like?".
What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?
Ask questions and come prepared with references.
If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?
Neve 1073, U67, SM57, KM84's, 1176. (Assuming I had something to plug them into and band to work with!)
What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?
Self-taught, and I've been doing this 15 years full time. Had a studio in Atlanta and learned on the job. Moved to San Francisco in 2008 and did a lot of the biggest things in that town (I still do a lot of work up there). I had a room at Coast Recorders - a Bill Putnam room - and now I work out of Tiny Telephone when I'm up there. I moved to LA in February 2015 and have been getting traction down here almost instantly.
How would you describe your style?
I don't have a style. That's my style. Nobody wants to hear an Andy Freeman record, they want to hear a record by their favorite artists. It's up to me to see what the artist wants and take it there.
Which artist would you like to work with and why?
Kings of Leon. I don't know their process (other than the documentary and their albums) but I think I could make a great record with them.
Can you share one music production tip?
If i'm in a room with a band working on songs, I want them thinking about making musical sense. I want them asking "why am I playing this right now?". To connect with a listener, every aspect of a song has to have thought behind it. The listener will care only as much as the artist does.
What type of music do you usually work on?
Indie and rock.
What's your strongest skill?
Beyond just technical skills (which should be the barrier of entry for something like this) handling people and managing expectations are strong suits of mine. I get along with artists very, very well.
What do you bring to a song?
I'm really good at making a song sound like what it should be. I don't have a "sound" of my own. If a band gives me references and the lines of communication are open, I can take it most anywhere.
What's your typical work process?
For mixing, I'll talk with the band (phone/skype/facetime/email) and figure out where they want the project to go. I'll get references and study those. When I get the tracks I listen faders-up and start digging in. I'm comfortable doing recalls and know how to guide a band through the process. For production, I get a notebook and the band's discography and start taking notes. Then it's time to listen to demos of the new stuff, hit the rehearsal space for lots of pre-production. By the time we go to a nice studio, the songs are ready and we can focus on tones and performances.
Tell us about your studio setup.
For mixing: Hybrid or in-the-box depending on what the music calls for. I have an 18-chip UAD2 system (Thunderbolt), mix with Pro Tools HD 12.1 and have a lot of analog stuff for the hybrid thing - Neve, API, Electrodyne, Empirical Labs, etc. I mix on Tannoy System 10's and Pelonis System 42's. For tracking and production work, I have TONS of drums (five kits, 15 snares), a dozen or so guitars and basses, lots and lots of tube amps of various vintages, and a healthy collection of my essential mics, like Coles, Bock, Soundelux, vintage Neumann, etc. I work out of the best-sounding room I can find, given budget.
What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?
Michael Beinhorn, Andrew Scheps, Vance Powell. I'm pleased to call them all friends.
Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.
Production/Engineering/Mixing. For production, I mean old-school. Getting in a room with a band and working out songs together. For mixing, I'm comfortable with remote mixing over the internet. I also stream mixes as I'm working on them so the client can feel involved.