Jon Kal Bass

Innovative bassist

Jon Kal Bass on SoundBetter

The Bassist for your Vision. A bassist in the new age - bringing new and old techniques to fill out your low ends on whatever bit of music you like. Don't just do what CAN be done but what SHOULD be done.

Music is my lifelong passion - both performing and writing. My passion for music is what motivates me to be professional as an artist; though I like to marinate in a piece of music, my focus does not wander from deadlines and expectations. I have played professional performances with past bands and also artists who have hired me to perform. Aside from performing, I have have recorded with many professional studio engineers and and artists. I am at the stage of my career where I a looking to make a portfolio, not a living.
I am very open to ideas for your bass lines and prefer some sort of reference (could be a song or a bassist). Very hands on when it comes to collaboration and believe that working together will make things easier for the both of us. That being said, I am also able to work with minimal aid and will still guarantee a passionate bass line.
I have a few years experience using digital recording software and have top quality gear/plugins. If there's a particular tone you're looking for, I'm certain I can find it.

Send me a note through the contact button above.

Interview with Jon Kal Bass

  1. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  2. A: Right now I am working on a few projects 1) Always trying to build the samples on my website. They're mostly covers, but I love putting in my input where I feel the bass is lacking. 2) I am also working with a Youtube channel to produce a Rush cover - YYZ. This has been a lot of fun because this was one of the first songs I remember hearing that bass had a place in loud music. I hope to work with them again in the future 3) There is a young local artist who has some up and coming opportunities and we have been talking about song writing together.

  3. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  4. A: Both. Analog (especially vintage) has quality tones for when it comes to power. If you need something to sound good but also be powerful, analog has always been my choice. You do get lots of noise, but its about learning how to trade off so that the noise is minimal and the tone is still big. Analog is also easier to mess around with. Digital is the process of perfecting analog and I believe it has come a long way. When I record, 90$ of the time, I rely on that smooth, clean, digital sound. I guess a very general summary would be; analog is better live but digital is better for recording.

  5. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  6. A: I promise you will not find difficulty when working with me. I pride myself in my ability to reason and meet compromises where they are needed.

  7. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  8. A: That it is also my passion in life. I have always believed that music is the only thing in this world that is something out of a fantasy novel. I also enjoy taking control of my own responsibilities and being my own boss when it comes to managing and delegating a project.

  9. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  10. A: Right now I am working on a few projects 1) Always trying to build the samples on my website. They're mostly covers, but I love putting in my input where I feel the bass is lacking. 2) I am also working with a Youtube channel to produce a Rush cover - YYZ. This has been a lot of fun because this was one of the first songs I remember hearing that bass had a place in loud music. I hope to work with them again in the future 3) There is a young local artist who has some up and coming opportunities and we have been talking about song writing together.

  11. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  12. A: Both. Analog (especially vintage) has quality tones for when it comes to power. If you need something to sound good but also be powerful, analog has always been my choice. You do get lots of noise, but its about learning how to trade off so that the noise is minimal and the tone is still big. Analog is also easier to mess around with. Digital is the process of perfecting analog and I believe it has come a long way. When I record, 90$ of the time, I rely on that smooth, clean, digital sound. I guess a very general summary would be; analog is better live but digital is better for recording.

  13. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  14. A: I promise you will not find difficulty when working with me. I pride myself in my ability to reason and meet compromises where they are needed.

  15. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  16. A: That it is also my passion in life. I have always believed that music is the only thing in this world that is something out of a fantasy novel. I also enjoy taking control of my own responsibilities and being my own boss when it comes to managing and delegating a project.

  17. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  18. A: "Can you sound like..." "Can you come up with..." These type of questions are common as I said a lot of bass in this age is dynamic and people are starting to desire some unique stuff. They are hesitant because they don't want you to feel as you are expected to be able to play according to those expectations. But I always ensure, tell me specifically what you want and I will do the research. Really, anything is possible if we are open to discuss possibilities with one another.

  19. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  20. A: Bass is easy. Writing music is easy. Being professional is easy. Only sometimes, but that goes with everything else.

  21. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  22. A: 1) What are your goals for this project? Timelines, progress, tones, marketing, finances 2) What can you tell me specifically about your music? Can you reduce it music theory? Can you describe it to me? How long does it have to be? 3) What are your expectations for me? Describe what you want done particularly by me on your project.

  23. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  24. A: Make sure you know what you are looking for. If you know the style and tone of a specific player, then look as specific as you need be and do not treat money as an obstacle in your quest to achieve your goals. But if you are looking to get a project done with all emotion left at the door, then hire professionally. Music is a wonderful industry, but it also comes with a large aspect of business with it. Nobody hires the business where excuses are the only product produced.

  25. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  26. A: All my basses? I'm assuming there's no electricity but I love to play my basses above all else so even with electricity, it really wouldn't change my answer. I try for a variety so they are tuned and set up for specific kinds of genres and I don't really like to limit my creativity when it comes to playing.

  27. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  28. A: The name of the career is professional session bassist. This recently came to me as a reality in the past 4 years. Before then, I just played for recreational reasons. I didn't even practice to a click, just to tracks that I had been playing to at that time. Up until 4 years ago my technique was also very minimal. It has been a long journey so far, but today I have about ten clients, lots of experience for recording and performing, and a website with some decent social media exposure.

  29. Q: How would you describe your style?

  30. A: Modern and groovy. No matter the genre, the secret to bass is groove. And today, there are so many new techniques on the bass that are blowing up that are very useful when it comes to settling on the right groove in the right environment. If I hear a groove in my head, the execution will not scrutinize certain techniques - tapping, slapping, harmonics, strumming, chording, etc.

  31. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  32. A: I really would love to work with someone grand into Hip-hop like Post Malone or P!nk because I hear a lot of Hip-hop being done electronically on the lower end and its usually really simple. I think there's a misconception; if the instrumentation is too technical, then the vocals are not as focused. The song September by Earth, Wind & Fire has some radiant instrumentation going on the whole song and I always feel that upbeat vocal line. It all becomes one beautiful sound to me. I would like to use my talents to bring more to the Hip-hop or RnB genre where I believe the electric bass is really overlooked.

  33. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  34. A: Learn to EQ. It is way easier to mix and get your sound BEFORE the project is done. When you hear yourself while recording and it sounds AMAZING, you really take that into your overall tone; if you feel good, you sound good.

  35. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  36. A: My background is metal - dirty, fast, and explicit. This wasn't the worst upbringing as metal does have some moments that are musically proficient, but it did leave me avoiding some of the genres that I love to play today as well. Today, I play RnB, Jazz, Hip-hop, Rock, Electro, and Blues alongside metal. I have a long history of working on metal, but recently you can check out my website where I have some covers that are aimed more towards the other genres I mentioned.

  37. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  38. A: Tenacity; I don't give up. If there's something I want to play, I'll play it. If I want to play it my way or exactly like the original track, I will play it like that - so long as the expression is met. I remember when I first learned YYZ by Rush, I was playing it initially at about 115 bpm. But for a week I did nothing but slowly increase the tempo until I made it to 141 bpm. That song is insanely fast and stands as a homage for me on this principle. Same goes for your criticism and concerns. If you do not like want I present, I will keep trying until you are completed satisfied. I do not give up.

  39. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  40. A: Professionalism - I know this sounds vague, but have you ever wanted to get your music out and you can't because ONE person is being a bottleneck in your project? That stuff really bugs me. I schedule, plan tasks, report progress, state weaknesses and strengths, observe, do research, estimate and much more when it comes to a project. Music is what I love and brings me so much joy, but that is no excuse to be flakey about it. You will not only be satisfied by my playing/writing abilities, but also equally at how easy I was to work with.

  41. Q: What's your typical work process?

  42. A: Stage 1 - Feel the song: I follow the theory and the rhythm and see where it takes me. Once I get these two elements down, I'm ready for step two Stage 2 - Cut it up and write my lines: I go through section by section and write what I hear my role to be. This is dependent on the what key/modes the sopranos are playing and what timing the rhythm has. Stage 3 - Slow it down: I use a digital program to write the technical layout of the riffs I have come up with. This allows me to critically analyze the timing and theory I have come up with and ensures that my ideas really are appropriate for what the song is expecting from me. Stage 4 - Master it: Practice the music I have created until it becomes one with my style. This will allow me to put my final tonal touches on what I have come up with. Stage 5 - Recording (if applicable): This process can take the longest because some days you like the ideas you have for recording your work and some days you just want to start over. But good thing this is the last step

  43. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  44. A: Its very simple - A DI and an audio interface with two channels. The real secrets are the plug ins. I have a few amplifier modulators I like and I use the Universal Audio 1176 plug in of course. These play an essential role on the medium of sound I transport out of my digital stronghold. On top of that, I always use the Helios Type 69 EQ. This EQ really is magical and allows me to easily mix a solid bass tone in any style of music. And when I have to play something heavier, I use my Darkglass preamp with the Alpha/Omega ultra and connect it before the DI input channel - this removes A LOT of the hiss you get from the powerful Darkglass electronics.

  45. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  46. A: Mostly bassists who can make their sound come together. It is an instrument that takes extra care when considering what sound you want to make with it. That being said, it also depends on the genre; Nolly has a really good tone for when it comes to metal, Jaco Pastorius has by far my favorite fusion/funk/jazz tone, Mark King and Marcus Miller to me have some of the best slap sounds. This question is hard for me to just answer, but in short, I am nowhere shy of aspiration.

  47. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  48. A: I get a lot of performance-based work local to the greater Toronto area. Mostly mid-tier gigs ranging from an audience of 50 - 150 people. I have also been hired to write, record, edit, and mix bass lines for independent artists, but this is something new for me and I am looking for more opportunity in this particular field.

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Terms Of Service

1-2 days to learn the musical context of the song (Scales, chords, etc.) and 1-2 for writing bass lines that follow the percussive rhythms and musical melodies. Payment through PayPal please!

GenresSounds Like
  • Steve Harris
  • Jaco Pastorius
  • Enrico Galetta
Gear Highlights
  • Elite Fender V Jazz Bass
  • Deluxe MIM Fender Precision Bass
  • 77' Elite Fender Jazz Bass
  • Darkglass electronics
  • UA Arrow TB3 audio interface
  • Several UA and Presonus Plugins
  • Radial JDI passive direct box
  • Gallien Krueger Fusion 550 amplifier
More Photos