Carmen Borgia

Sound for picture

Carmen Borgia on SoundBetter

Audio post production for film and TV

Sound design and mixing for film and video by Carmen Borgia.

I do post sound for all kinds of films! If you're ready to mix and are concerned about the quality of sound from on-set, I'm happy to have a listen! Sometimes it's easier to fix problem sound than you think. If your project has been well-recorded, I can help you to achieve a great finish.

Related services include Foley, sound effects, ambiences, mastering for film, dialogue EQ and cleanup, project coordination, short films and feature length.

A lifetime music and sound maker, I ran a midtown NYC audio facility for 14 years, where I gained wide experience with a variety of clients for projects large and small. I work in my home studio in New York's Hudson Valley. Small jobs get the same care and respect as large ones.

Would love to hear from you. Click the contact button above to get in touch.

Interview with Carmen Borgia

  1. Q: Tell us about a project you worked on you are especially proud of and why. What was your role?

  2. A: PBS, An Original Duckumentary, my sound design, won Emmy for best nature documentary. A mix for Pilobolus Dance Company that played in Times Square on multiple jumbotrons. Horror films (Malevolence series) for Stevan Mena.

  3. Q: What are you working on at the moment?

  4. A: A feature horror film, a documentary on Palm Springs architecture, a stop motion trailer with dolls and race cars where I'm composing music and creating a sound design.

  5. Q: What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?

  6. A: • Do you mix feature films? Yes. • Do you do student films? Yes. • Can you make noisy and problematic audio sound good enough in my film? Probably. • Can you mix 5.1 sound? Yes. • Do you wear women's shoes when you Foley footsteps? If women are walking onscreen, yes. • Do you have a sound effects library? Yes, a rather large one.

  7. Q: What's the biggest misconception about what you do?

  8. A: People often think the recorded sound is so bad that it can't be used, but that's always best to start with. Most of the time I make great use of all of the sound that has been given to me, without having to re-record dialogue.

  9. Q: What questions do you ask prospective clients?

  10. A: • May I screen a cut of your film? • What is the film trying to accomplish? • When do you need it? • Where is it to be screened? • Do you have a budget? • Are you working with a composer or other post people? • Do you have a technical specification sheet from a film festival or distributor?

  11. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  12. A: Finish editing your picture with the sound as untouched as possible, except for volume changes. Then let me have a look/listen and we'll talk. It's best for me to hear the sound in it's natural state, before any eq or noise reduction has been applied. If in doubt, ask me!

  13. Q: What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?

  14. A: I started cutting 1/4" tape in 1970's high school drama productions. I got into Pro Tools in the 90's doing film post. I'm self-taught in the sense that I don't have a formal music and technical education, but I always learn from seeing others do it. I've been doing this for a long time, so I've accumulated a lot of knowledge.

  15. Q: Which artist would you like to work with and why?

  16. A: Brad Bird, a great director.

  17. Q: What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?

  18. A: Film mixers! Rickie Lee Jones, Charlie Haden and XTC on the music side, but really, pretty much everything. Les Paul was the original home studio guy, from him I get permission to try things. George Massenberg, Tom Dowd, Malcolm Cecil for engineers.

  19. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  20. A: To make the sound you have given me sound as great as possible.

  21. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  22. A: The mixing board that knows when I touch it.

  23. Q: What's your typical work process?

  24. A: Process is based around the needs of the project. If it's mixing only I do a pass and return to the client for notes. If sound design is involved, there may be more back and forth.

  25. Q: What's your 'promise' to your clients?

  26. A: To make the sound you have given me sound as great as possible.

  27. Q: What do you like most about your job?

  28. A: The mixing board that knows when I touch it.

  29. Q: What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

  30. A: Finish editing your picture with the sound as untouched as possible, except for volume changes. Then let me have a look/listen and we'll talk. It's best for me to hear the sound in it's natural state, before any eq or noise reduction has been applied.

  31. Q: What type of music do you usually work on?

  32. A: Documentaries, narrative shorts and features, trailers, instructional videos, promos, ads and things for the Web.

  33. Q: What's your strongest skill?

  34. A: Sound design, and by extension, mixing.

  35. Q: What's your typical work process?

  36. A: Process is based around the needs of the project. If it's mixing only I do a pass and return to the client for notes. If sound design is involved, there may be more back and forth.

  37. Q: Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.

  38. A: Film mixing in stereo and 5.1 I probably do the most. I also design sound for picture projects, which includes effects and ambience work, Foleys, dialogue editing and ADR.

  39. Q: If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?

  40. A: A Martin 2k ukulele, iPhone, upright bass, a djembe and my fantastic wife, Alison, who is a classically trained soprano. She's not really gear, but who needs gear without a soprano?

  41. Q: How would you describe your style?

  42. A: Listen, reflect, twist a knob, repeat.

  43. Q: Analog or digital and why?

  44. A: Digital! I also love analog, and I use it where appropriate.

  45. Q: Can you share one music production tip?

  46. A: Listen to the mix very quietly to insure balances are solid and roadworthy.

  47. Q: What do you bring to a song?

  48. A: A desire to get every drop of impact, meaning and expression from the audio I have been given to mix.

  49. Q: Tell us about your studio setup.

  50. A: My main system is Pro Tools 10 HD with 5.1 and stereo monitoring. My main mix room is nicely sized and translates well for theaters, web and broadcast.

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Don't Think Twice, It's Alright sung by Carmen Borgia

I was the singer and played uke, accordion by Bob Goldberg, Bass by Rich Keil in this production

Terms Of Service

Flat rate mixing - 1 pass plus 2 rounds of notes. Hourly work - all the notes you want!

Gear Highlights
  • Pro Tools HD
  • Amek BC2
  • Avalon 737
  • Neumann and Schoeps mics
  • Genelec and Adam monitors. Great Foley setup
  • I build my own gear and FX as needed.
More Photos
SoundBetter Deal

Intro deal! Short film stereo mix - 4 minutes or less - $100