When I hear a new piece of music, a bass line immediately starts to form in my head...

Marco Bass Guitars endorsed bass player specializing in rock, funk, metal, blues, and anything between. Easy to work with in the studio, incredibly fast learner, and love nothing more than laying down the low end to help complete your vision! Also glad to play a producer role, as a second opinion can be super valuable in the pre-production stage (and don't charge for pre-production/ structure help if I'm playing bass on the album).

I have quite a bit of studio work and ton of live shows under my belt. I'm generally full-timing it in at least a few Seattle bands, but I will always make time to lay down the low end on your album or fill in for some gigs. Hit me up!

My credits include

Gear highlights

  • Marco Bass Custom TFL with hand wound bridge humbucker and jazz neck pickup
  • Music Man Stingray 5
  • Assortment of Fender Jazz basses (US
  • MX
  • fretless)
  • Ibanez acoustic bass
  • Several amps and cabs
  • Huge array of effects

Genres I specialize in

Endorse Ian "Liquid Fingers" Sides


Interview with Ian "Liquid Fingers" Sides

Analog or digital and why?
Depends on what you're going for. I love the satisfaction of nailing an entire take onto 2" tape, but some prefer punching into pro-tools 25 times to absolutely nail their exact vision. Amazing music has been created using both, and I am comfortable with with either.
If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?
My Marco Bass and 4 sets of strings!
What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?
15 years ago, I wanted to play the bass so badly. I was signed up for piano lessons instead, and it was only after working full time for an entire summer (at the age of 12) that I could afford my first bass. I have been playing as much as I possibly can ever since.
Can you share one music production tip?
Pre-production is incredibly useful. Use whatever means you have to record a demo of your songs long before you hit the studio. It sounds obvious, but you will gain a very different perspective listening to your songs than playing them, however horrible the recording quality is.
What type of music do you usually work on?
Rock, funk, singer-songwriter, reggae, and metal
What do you bring to a song?
I bring the funk! Or the soul, or the perfectly timed root notes. It all depends on what you're looking for in your composition. But left to my own devices, I generally lend a funky flavor.
What's your typical work process?
I typically like to first listen to a song or idea in it entirety. By this time I generally start to hear bass lines in my head, learn how to play them, and tweak and compose the bass line until I'm happy with it. Then, I like hearing the vision for the bass (if applicable), the meaning of the song, and any other relevant details. Sometimes this means completely rewriting the part, but more often than not the bass lines that flow through me on the first listen end up being he right fit! I don't know where they come from, but I'm glad they do.
Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.
Studio work, filling in for gigs