Hi, I'm Sybren Roefs, Producer and Audio Engineer at Djehuty Studio. At my studio I record true music for a fair price. I believe in both the sound of analog gear and the possibilities of digital gear. Therefore, I use both! But all in the service of one thing... your music!

The name Djehuty Studio is derived from the Egyptian God of balance in the universe. Our music is often a means to bring balance to this world. So record your music and enlighten the world!

It is a professional studio for recording and mixing. We offer fair prices for true musicians. We acknowledge that recording and mixing a song is part of the artistic proces. There are great differences between the results from any two mixing engineers. Therefore it is of tremendous importance that you, as a musician, choose your studio based on musical arguments, rather than economical ones.

Sybren Roefs is a professional who graduated Cum Laude from Sound Education Netherlands. Since then he did multiple additional training courses and he worked as assistant with Huub Reijnders. He's done many projects as chief engineer after that, including Anne Wouterlood, Sh!zl, Inigo and Sailing to Suez.

My credits include

Gear highlights

  • Allen&Heath GS-R24M
  • PT12
  • SSL bus compressor
  • Antelope Orion 32
  • Neve 1073
  • UA LA-610
  • UA 4-710d
  • WA12
  • Mics by AKG
  • Peluso
  • Coles
  • Shure
  • Plugins by UAD
  • Slate Digital
  • Fabfilter Pro
  • etc

Genres I specialize in

Terms of Service

Negotiable before every session.

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Interview with Djehuty Studio

What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?
Provide me with a soundboard which has a couple of songs that you feel have a great arrangement or mix and tell me what you like about it. Also give me some examples of what you don't like. That gives me some clues about your vision, 'cause I want you to be happy with the result!
How would you describe your style?
I like to bring out the human part in the music. I want instruments to sound organic, live or even raw and distorted. But naturally, sometimes the music asks for exceptions.
Analog or digital and why?
This question is obsolete. The debate was relevant 10 years ago. But nowadays you can get a good sound with either. And since my workflow is better with digital, so my result are better with digital.
What do you like most about your job?
I love that I can create something artistic. Because that's what it is; we're working on a piece of art.
What questions do customers most commonly ask you? What's your answer?
Customer: "Can you make us sound like that band?" I: "Well, do you sound like that?" Customer: "No, not yet..." I: "Keep practicing and get some good gear, because your going to sound like what and how you are playing."
If you were on a desert island and could take just 5 pieces of gear, what would they be?
Uhm... a power generator? Any instrument really. A SM57, not because it is my first choice as a mic, but because it cannot be destructed. (And you can use it as a hammer to build a hut) My Apollo Twin, because it is so multifunctional and great! A computer with something like Pro Tools, of course.
What was your career path? How long have you been doing this?
I'm in the recording business since 2012, but I have been a professional musician since 2001 and work as a drum teacher since 2004. Nowadays most of my time is spend in the studio.
Can you share one music production tip?
I really love a good source sound. That means a good musician, instrument and room. But then the gear (and how to use it!) comes into play. Through the years I found some things that work, and some that don't. But a fine mic through a Neve 1073 into either a quality tape machine or my Antelope Orion converter always works.
What type of music do you usually work on?
Rock, Pop, Jazzy stuff, and occasionally HipHop or hybrid stuff.
What's your strongest skill?
I think it's important to just be a good person. I want everyone to feel good about recording.
What do you bring to a song?
Detail. Don't just press record. Ask yourself: do the drums sound right? If not, what needs to be changed? Sometimes it helps just asking the drummer to play a little lighter on the cymbals to get a killer tone. Or to ask a guitar player to play a little further from the bridge of his guitar, or whatever helps the song.
What's your typical work process?
Getting the sound right at the source! Then finding a way to record it in a compelling way.
Tell us about your studio setup.
Though I've got an awesome GS-R24M motorized mixing desk, I use my external preamps most of the time. I've got some great ones like the Universal Audio LA-610 and 4-710d, the Warm Audio WA12 and of course my beautiful Neve 1073. The desk works more as a summing and routing box for me. I use the awesome Antelope Orion 32 converters, which makes everything sound so clear and detailed. And in the box (with Pro Tools 11) I have plugins by Slate Digital, Fabfilter Pro, Universal Audio, SoundToys and more of that. But of course it starts with a microphone. I've got a pair of Coles 4038's, Peluso P28's and a P67, and more stuff by AKG, Shure, BeyerDynamic, and so on.
What other musicians or music production professionals inspire you?
Musicians: Sun Ra, John Coltrane, Fela Kuti, Sunny Murray, Moondog, Brant Bjork, Ane Brun. Engineers: Eric Sarafin, Dave Pensado, Butch Vig, John McBride, Sylvia Massy.
Describe the most common type of work you do for your clients.
I just love to record music. Even more so if we have the means to record aggressively, as in: making it sound exactly how you want it to be on record. But mixing, mastering, I love it all. And every time I find music that really does something to me, I want to produce it!